To the Moon

(ENGLISH / GERMAN)


 

During last year’s November I stumpled upon the little indie adventure To the Moon and now finally found the time to give it the attention that it deserves. I searched long and hard to find a good introduction to describe the game, but it’s impossible to write anything better than John Walker in his Wot I think (so whoever wants to read an actually good review… there’s your link). It simply speaks volumes when someone who has been reviewing games professionally for over 12 years writes something like this:

 

I’m not sure whether to write a review, or curl up in the fetal position and hug a pillow.

 

The game costs about 12 Euros and is soled only on the company’s website as far as I know. Its soundtrack recently appeared as part of the Game Music Bundle and was praised beyond the game’s own boundaries – not least because of its composer Laura Shigihara, who was also responsible for the soundtrack of Plants vs. Zombies.

To the Moon: Lighthouse

Ok… now that I’ve thrown around some links, let’s get to the game:
Generally speaking this game is some kind of Adventure-RPG, but without much of any actual game elements. It’s all about the story and sometimes you might wonder if it’s more of an interactive story than a “real” game. The graphics come in a pixelart style with a touch of JRPG, texts are only perceived as speech bubbles. But there’s also some animated, drawn sequences that the player will get to see.

When I’m talking here about “story”, I really mean “STORY!”. Not in the sense of “hey, nice beackground, believable plot, great presentation”, because that’s what’s actually behind giving the attribute “good story” to games like Mass Effect or Dragon Age. As much as I love those games… they don’t tell a real original and emotional story. The characters are amazing, but the SciFi- or Fantasy settings add some kind of distance which prevents the player from actually caring too much. And the actual plot again comes down to something along the lines of “Gasp! <Generic enemy> threatens mankind! Let’s save the world and chew bubblegum!”

But “To the Moon” also starts with a SciFi background:
Basically it’s about two doctors – Eva and Neil – who are working for foundation that is out to grant a last wish to dying people. For this they’ve put together a machine that allows our two doctors to get into the memories of the patient and rewrite them so that the patient believes he’s fulfilled his own wish at some point during his life. And that’s the point where the science fiction stops. In the world of the game this is nothing special and the two doctors always talk about this as a normal everyday job.

So Eva and Neil have a new client, a new patient: Johnny, an old man lying in coma. His last wich: He wants to go to the moon. But even in his memories he doesn’t know why. It falls to the player to steer the two doctors through the patient’s memories, to find out why he wants to go to the moon and how to fulfill this wish. In this way, the story is told backwards and the farther you get back in time, the clearer the picture of this man’s life gets. In the single memory segments you have to search for five special objects connected to this segment. They are in turn used to unlock a bigger memory that takes you to the next (i.e. earlier) stage. Finding those objects is done by simple search-and-cicking combined with a mini puzzle game that I personally find rather unnecessary.

The game is not carried by its gameplay though, but by the plot. Whoever has wished for a more “mature” story in a video game: Here it is! This is indeed the first game that touched me on an emotional level. We’re not dealing with characters here who may be very interesting or even tragic but will undoubtedly save the world in the end. This game tells a heartbreaking story about a dying man who lost his wife two years ago under very sad circumstances and whom you’ll get to know a lot about that I don’t want to spoil here.

This may sound cheesy at first but it is in fact never perceived as such. By playing the doctors who are looking at Johnny’s life from an outside perspective, the game even manages to use their banter as comedy and creates some genuinely funny moments. It is not even above breaking the 4th Wall from time to time – but as always not too excessively. The characters are amazingly elaborate, rather complex and very refreshingly not stereotopic. Neil for instance got quite on my nerves at the beginning and I thought of him as rather an idiot. During the game however he developed into a really interesting character, that I genuinely liked in the end.

This game manages to tell a moving tale. There are a few bits which may be foreseeable and some surprises. There are funny moments and sad ones. There are allusions, that the player has to ponder upon. There is just everything that makes a good story. And this is exactly why this game to me is not only the first game to stir my tear glands but also the first counterproof to the old prejudice of “Stories in games will never be as good as in movies or books”. It’s about sacrifice, life decisions, insecurity, character development and of course about love. And all that is achieved by the game within the boundaries of a simple (if detailled animated) pixel graphic, with only texts instead of voiceover, without photorealistic facial animations, but with a hauntingly beautiful soundtrack.

I am really deeply impressed. Whoever has 12 Euros left for an indie game and is not above letting oneself in for a tragical story, simplay has to play it. It’s worth it.

 

/tehK


 

Letztes Jahr im November bin ich auf das kleine Indie-Adventure To the Moon aufmerksam geworden und habe jetzt endlich mal die Zeit gefunden, diesem Kleinod die verdiente Aufmerksamkeit zu schenken. Ich habe lange nach einer tollen Einleitung gesucht, die das Spiel gut beschreibt, aber es ist unmöglich, das besser zu machen als John Walker in seinem Wot I think (wer also eine richtig gute Review lesen will… hier ist der Link). Es spricht einfach Bände, wenn jemand, der seit über 12 Jahren professionell Spiele reviewed in seiner Einleitung etwas schreibt wie:

 

I’m not sure whether to write a review, or curl up in the fetal position and hug a pillow.

 

Das Spiel kostet umgerechnet ca. 12 Euro und wird, so weit ich weiß, auch nur auf der hauseigenen Website verkauft. Der Soundtrack erschien vor Kurzem auch als Teil des Game Music Bundle und erreichte auch über das Spiel hinweg große Anerkennung – nicht zuletzt dank der Komponistin Laura Shigihara, die auch für den Plants vs. Zombies Soundtrack verantwortlich war.

To the Moon: Lighthouse

Jetzt hab ich genug mit Links um mich geworfen – mal was zum eigentlichen Spiel:
Wir haben hier eine Art Adventure-RPG, aber (um es gleich vorweg zu nehmen) ohne wirklich bahnbrechende Spielelemente. Im Vordergrund steht einzig und alleine die Story und manchmal fragt man sich schon, ob’s nicht eher eine interaktive Geschichte ist und kein Spiel. Für die Graphik kommt Pixelart in einem JRPG-Stil zum Einsatz, Texte werden allein durch Sprechblasen dargestellt, aber auch ein paar gezeichnete Zwischensequenzen bekommt der Spieler zu sehen.

Wenn ich jetzt von “Story” und “interaktiver Geschichte” rede, dann meine ich damit wirklich “STORY!” – und zwar nicht im Sinne von “viel Hintergrund, glaubhafte Geschichte, gute Präsentation”. Das versteckt sich nämlich eigentlich hinter Spielen wie Mass Effect oder Dragon Age, die oft mit dem Attribut “gute Story” versehen werden. Denn bleiben wir ehrlich: So gut ich die Spiele finde… sie erzählen keine wirklich originelle und emotionale Geschichte. Die Charaktere sind fantastisch, aber durch die SciFi- oder Fantasywelt dann doch zu weit entrückt, als dass ich mir als Spieler wirkliche Sorgen um sie mache und die eigentliche Handlung ist halt dann doch irgendwo “Huch! <Generischer Feind> bedroht die Menschheit! Lasst uns die Welt retten!”

Aber auch “To the Moon” hat erst einmal einen SciFi-Hintergrund: Grundsätzlich geht es um zwei Ärzte – Eva und Neil – die für eine Stiftung arbeiten und sterbenden Menschen einen letzten Wunsch erfüllen. Dazu benutzen sie eine Maschine, mit deren Hilfe sie in die Erinnerungen des Patienten eindringen und diese so umschreiben, dass der Sterbende glaubt, er habe sich den Wunsch irgendwann selbst erfüllt. An der Stelle endet aber die Science Fiction und in der Spielwelt selbst ist das dann auch nichts besonderes mehr, sondern ein ganz normaler Job.

Eva und Neil haben jetzt also einen neuen Patienten: Johnny, ein alter Mann, der im Koma liegt. Sein Wunsch: Er will zum Mond. In seinen Erinnerungen weiß er aber nicht mehr warum. Für den Spieler gilt es, die beiden Ärzte durch die Erinnerungen des Patienten zu steuern und herauszufinden, warum er diesen Wunsch eigentlich hat und wie man ihn erfüllen kann. Die Geschichte wird also rückwärts erzählt und je weiter man in den Erinnerungen zurückgeht, desto klarer wird das Bild vom Leben dieses Mannes. In den einzelnen Erinnerungen sieht der Spieler Johnny mit seiner Frau und seinen Freunden reden und muss in jedem Zeitabschnitt fünf spezielle Erinnerungsstücke finden. Damit kann man eine größere Erinnerung freischalten, die als Zugangspunkt zur nächsten, früheren Erinnerung benötigt wird. Die Sachen zu finden, ist simples Suchen und Klicken, kombiniert mit einem Minispiel, das ich persönlich sogar für unnötig erachte.

Das Spiel wird nicht durch das Gameplay getragen, sondern durch die Story. Wer sich schon immer eine “erwachsenere” Story in einem Videospiel gewünscht hat: Hier findet man sie! Das ist wirklich das erste Spiel, das mich auf einer emotionalen Ebene… vielleicht nicht mitgenommen, aber doch auf jeden Fall berührt hat. Es sind eben keine Charaktere, die zwar interessant oder auch tragisch sind, aber am Ende doch die Welt retten. Hier wird eine herzergreifende Geschichte erzählt um einen im sterben liegenden Mann, der vor zwei Jahren seine Frau unter sehr traurigen Umständen verloren hat und über den man einiges erfahren wird, was ich hier nicht verraten möchte.

Was sich jetzt vielleicht leicht kitschig anhört, kommt im Spiel in keiner Sekunde so rüber. Dadurch, dass man die Ärzte spielt, die das von außen betrachten, erzeugt vor allem das Geplänkel zwischen Eva und Neil sogar einige echte, aufrichtige Lacher. Das Spiel ist sich auch nicht zu schade, zwischendurch die 4th Wall zu brechen – aber auch hier nie überzogen. Dass man die Ärzte spielt, heißt aber nicht, dass man zum reinen Beobachter verkommt. Alle Charactere im Spiel sind wirklich fantastisch ausgearbeitet, durchaus komplex und erfrischenderweise keine Stereotypen. Gerade Neil (einer der beiden Ärzte) kam mir am Anfang wie ein Idiot vor und seinen Zynismus fand ich furchtbar unpsasend. Im Laufe des Spiels hat er sich aber zu einem wirklich interessanten Charakter entwickelt, den ich am Ende wirklich mochte.

Das Spiel schafft es, eine ergreifende Geschichte zu erzählen. Es gibt ein paar Stellen, die sind mehr oder weniger voraussehbar und es gibt Überraschungen. Es gibt lustige Momente und traurige. Es gibt Andeutungen, bei denen man selbst nachdenken muss. Es gibt einfach alles, was eine gute Story ausmacht. Und damit ist das Spiel für mich nicht nur das erste Spiel, das mir auf die Tränendrüsen drückt, sondern auch der erste Gegenbeweis zu: “Stories in Spielen werden nie so gut sein wie Bücher oder Filme”. Es geht um Verlust, Lebensentscheidungen, Unsicherheit, charakterliche Entwicklung und natürlich irgendwo auch um Liebe. Und das alles schafft das Spiel mit einer einfachen (wenn auch detailliert animierten) Pixelgraphik, ohne Sprachausgabe und nur mit Texten, ohne fotorealistischen Gesichtsanimationen, aber mit einem wunderschönen Soundtrack.

Ich bin wirklich schwer beeindruckt. Wer 12 Euro für einen Indie-Titel übrig hat und sich nicht zu schade ist, sich auch auf eine tragische Geschichte einzulassen, muss das spielen. Es lohnt sich.

 

/tehK

 

Comment

Loading Facebook Comments ...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

No Trackbacks.